A Desert Celebration III

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Our table is set with vintage flatware, goblets, plates and medicinal bottle vases from the exquisite antique rental company, Small Masterpiece. The gorgeous knives are authentic bone, horn, ivory, and wood with a perfect reflection of age-old American craft. The forks and spoons are a collection of engraved silver from early twentieth century bourgeois family heirlooms. The authentic Early American Pressed Glass goblets and the plates are steeped with character and hearty ceramic work.

The table runner is an organic cotton shawl from Paige’s personal collection. Setting your tables with various runners of Southwestern tapestries, woven monk’s cloth, vintage lace, all can work for an eclectic reception design. A discovery of each new table. Vintage flea markets and ebay are great resources for this. We designed our table props with cactus wood, antlers, New Mexican pottery, an old copper pitcher, vintage books and of course a camera from 1920 to represent Alfred. The poppies, bones and cactus wood are quintessential Georgia.

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We chose to dye strips of cheesecloth, old sheets, cotton gauze, and monk’s cloth in the vibrant hues of our inspiration. We tied them up between tree branches for a fun photo prop background, head table bunting, or simply an artful installation. We tied on thin strips to create a windy flag on one end and attached poppies to tie in our florals. The dichotomy of the soft fabric and the old tree was a feminine/masculine play on the nature of Georgia and Alfred.

Photography by Charley Star

Event Design/Styling by Bash Eco Events

Flowers + Event Design/Styling by Yes Please Design

Stay tuned for one last bit of inspiration coming up next!

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10 Responses to “A Desert Celebration III”

  1. Elizabeth M.

    I really like the cheesecloth installation too. And it doesn’t seem to be too difficult to execute which is always a plus!

    Reply

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